Defining Leads for Marketing & Sales
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Digital Deal Rooms - Top Uses
The New B2B Sales Game
Your Story is Your Strategy
The New B2B Sales Game
Prospecting with Video
The New B2B Sales Game
Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

The Different vs the Default Sales Manager

In some sectors, the average lifespan of a sales manager is at 13 months, with two years considered a success. Even fewer managers than salespeople are trained or equipped to do their job, one that is amongst the toughest in business. Why is it tough? Because unlike any other business area, in sales you live with probabilities that are only found in nature. "Risk" in sales doesn't mean something is hard or difficult: it means the odds of making the right thing happen against the clock are always slim. Sales comes with a clock, in case you were thinking of trying your hand it as a career!

Nobody teaches you how to be an effective or useful sales manager, so most managers tend to towards being default managers, just like most sellers are default salespeople. And there is one particular sign that you are heading in the default sales management direction. You find yourself making one - reactionary - change after another. We call this death by a thousand tweaks. You adjust the CRM to suit seller A, but seller B wants a different twist. This week everyone wants a new pdf, a different landing page is needed and those daily reports are not really working, so scrap them. Endless feedback and stress-driven moves means nothing gets agreed nor done - at least nothing that matters. Sellers become defensive and the manager tweaks even more.

The Different Sales Manager

One of the critical milestones in the life of an SMB is when it gets sales management right. Up to that point, growth is dependent on either the CEO or founder or a single sales champion who eventually reaches heroic physical limits. But what's needed is not a default sales manager. What's needed is the different sales manager. There are two things the different sales manager does, that are clear and deliberate:

1 They set up a sales architecture, independent of who is currently on the team or who they want on the team. The architecture determines the talent, and not the other way round. The architecture is designed to answer the big sales questions: how do we get more customers? How do we increase deal and customer value? How do we get more sales in less time? These are the questions senior management keep asking. (Explore here what we mean by architecture in a sales management context). This is the architecture pillar of great sales management and the table stakes first job of the different sales manager.

2 The different sales manager links execution to the big goals by securing daily and weekly commitments to actions that deliver key metrics that in turn deliver the big goals. This is the activation pillar of great sales management. The different sales manager activates. In practice, activations are relatively short, focused sprints of selling activity with specific KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), a firm timeline boundary, and a cadence of daily and weekly commitments, accountability and review. When the different sales manager begins to operate this way they graduate from giving blanket advice and making a thousand tweaks to supporting daily income generation in a way that sellers can attach to their their own monthly compensation.

Architect & Activate
One of the benefits of distilling your sales management role into two - symbolic - words is that it helps you rise above the daily maelstrom of urgent but anti-income demands that kill real sales activity. We call this stuff. Activations for example, are at the top of the daily queue and push "stuff" out of the way. The architecture then checks if the daily stuff is making a counter-attack and winning out. Eventually, the different manager purifies the working sales environment enough that the big commercial goals get the time and attention needed - daily.

We'll be releasing the Different Manager toolkit in the fall, starting with an audio-book. If you want to be notified, email enquire@salesvirtual.com.

Michael McGowan

Sales Virtual

m: +353-87-9449521 | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 |+1 (929) 214 1072 | michael@salesvirtual.com |

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Defining Leads for Marketing & Sales
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Digital Deal Rooms - Top Uses
The New B2B Sales Game
Your Story is Your Strategy
The New B2B Sales Game
Prospecting with Video
The New B2B Sales Game
Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

The Different vs the Default Sales Manager

In some sectors, the average lifespan of a sales manager is at 13 months, with two years considered a success. Even fewer managers than salespeople are trained or equipped to do their job, one that is amongst the toughest in business. Why is it tough? Because unlike any other business area, in sales you live with probabilities that are only found in nature. "Risk" in sales doesn't mean something is hard or difficult: it means the odds of making the right thing happen against the clock are always slim. Sales comes with a clock, in case you were thinking of trying your hand it as a career!

Nobody teaches you how to be an effective or useful sales manager, so most managers tend to towards being default managers, just like most sellers are default salespeople. And there is one particular sign that you are heading in the default sales management direction. You find yourself making one - reactionary - change after another. We call this death by a thousand tweaks. You adjust the CRM to suit seller A, but seller B wants a different twist. This week everyone wants a new pdf, a different landing page is needed and those daily reports are not really working, so scrap them. Endless feedback and stress-driven moves means nothing gets agreed nor done - at least nothing that matters. Sellers become defensive and the manager tweaks even more.

The Different Sales Manager

One of the critical milestones in the life of an SMB is when it gets sales management right. Up to that point, growth is dependent on either the CEO or founder or a single sales champion who eventually reaches heroic physical limits. But what's needed is not a default sales manager. What's needed is the different sales manager. There are two things the different sales manager does, that are clear and deliberate:

1 They set up a sales architecture, independent of who is currently on the team or who they want on the team. The architecture determines the talent, and not the other way round. The architecture is designed to answer the big sales questions: how do we get more customers? How do we increase deal and customer value? How do we get more sales in less time? These are the questions senior management keep asking. (Explore here what we mean by architecture in a sales management context). This is the architecture pillar of great sales management and the table stakes first job of the different sales manager.

2 The different sales manager links execution to the big goals by securing daily and weekly commitments to actions that deliver key metrics that in turn deliver the big goals. This is the activation pillar of great sales management. The different sales manager activates. In practice, activations are relatively short, focused sprints of selling activity with specific KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), a firm timeline boundary, and a cadence of daily and weekly commitments, accountability and review. When the different sales manager begins to operate this way they graduate from giving blanket advice and making a thousand tweaks to supporting daily income generation in a way that sellers can attach to their their own monthly compensation.

Architect & Activate
One of the benefits of distilling your sales management role into two - symbolic - words is that it helps you rise above the daily maelstrom of urgent but anti-income demands that kill real sales activity. We call this stuff. Activations for example, are at the top of the daily queue and push "stuff" out of the way. The architecture then checks if the daily stuff is making a counter-attack and winning out. Eventually, the different manager purifies the working sales environment enough that the big commercial goals get the time and attention needed - daily.

We'll be releasing the Different Manager toolkit in the fall, starting with an audio-book. If you want to be notified, email enquire@salesvirtual.com.

Michael McGowan

Sales Virtual

m: +353-87-9449521 | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 |+1 (929) 214 1072 | michael@salesvirtual.com |

Defining Leads for Marketing & Sales
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Digital Deal Rooms - Top Uses
The New B2B Sales Game
Your Story is Your Strategy
The New B2B Sales Game
Prospecting with Video
The New B2B Sales Game
Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

The Different vs the Default Sales Manager

In some sectors, the average lifespan of a sales manager is at 13 months, with two years considered a success. Even fewer managers than salespeople are trained or equipped to do their job, one that is amongst the toughest in business. Why is it tough? Because unlike any other business area, in sales you live with probabilities that are only found in nature. "Risk" in sales doesn't mean something is hard or difficult: it means the odds of making the right thing happen against the clock are always slim. Sales comes with a clock, in case you were thinking of trying your hand it as a career!

Nobody teaches you how to be an effective or useful sales manager, so most managers tend to towards being default managers, just like most sellers are default salespeople. And there is one particular sign that you are heading in the default sales management direction. You find yourself making one - reactionary - change after another. We call this death by a thousand tweaks. You adjust the CRM to suit seller A, but seller B wants a different twist. This week everyone wants a new pdf, a different landing page is needed and those daily reports are not really working, so scrap them. Endless feedback and stress-driven moves means nothing gets agreed nor done - at least nothing that matters. Sellers become defensive and the manager tweaks even more.

The Different Sales Manager

One of the critical milestones in the life of an SMB is when it gets sales management right. Up to that point, growth is dependent on either the CEO or founder or a single sales champion who eventually reaches heroic physical limits. But what's needed is not a default sales manager. What's needed is the different sales manager. There are two things the different sales manager does, that are clear and deliberate:

1 They set up a sales architecture, independent of who is currently on the team or who they want on the team. The architecture determines the talent, and not the other way round. The architecture is designed to answer the big sales questions: how do we get more customers? How do we increase deal and customer value? How do we get more sales in less time? These are the questions senior management keep asking. (Explore here what we mean by architecture in a sales management context). This is the architecture pillar of great sales management and the table stakes first job of the different sales manager.

2 The different sales manager links execution to the big goals by securing daily and weekly commitments to actions that deliver key metrics that in turn deliver the big goals. This is the activation pillar of great sales management. The different sales manager activates. In practice, activations are relatively short, focused sprints of selling activity with specific KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), a firm timeline boundary, and a cadence of daily and weekly commitments, accountability and review. When the different sales manager begins to operate this way they graduate from giving blanket advice and making a thousand tweaks to supporting daily income generation in a way that sellers can attach to their their own monthly compensation.

Architect & Activate
One of the benefits of distilling your sales management role into two - symbolic - words is that it helps you rise above the daily maelstrom of urgent but anti-income demands that kill real sales activity. We call this stuff. Activations for example, are at the top of the daily queue and push "stuff" out of the way. The architecture then checks if the daily stuff is making a counter-attack and winning out. Eventually, the different manager purifies the working sales environment enough that the big commercial goals get the time and attention needed - daily.

We'll be releasing the Different Manager toolkit in the fall, starting with an audio-book. If you want to be notified, email enquire@salesvirtual.com.

Michael McGowan

Sales Virtual

m: +353-87-9449521 | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 |+1 (929) 214 1072 | michael@salesvirtual.com |

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.