Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Sales Leadership: Who to Coach and How to Coach

This week's content is a webinar from Selling Power Magazine. We wanted to share it because it provides an excellent approach for framing a sales coaching strategy. In particular it will help you to answer the question: with whom do I invest scarce coaching time?

1. They recommend to coach a salesperson based on what they are prepared to do, rather than "attitude". Action trumps attitude. They give the example of a seller who needs to work on their discovery skills. If they are excited by their job and role they will show an improvement by "Friday evening" or not at all. If you have any experience as a manager, you will know this to be the case.

2. There is no point investing time with anyone where the desire is not there. Desire determines development. (This idea is not exclusive to sales).

3. All coaching should start with understanding the other person's point of view - even if it's a million miles from your own. It saves a lot of wasted time for the seller and the manager.

Why is this important?

Buyers have raised the bar for all suppliers, vendors and partners. Today, buyers only want to work with sellers whose advice is worth listening to. Buyers are always looking for better and easier ways to get things done. They only turn to salespeople when that channel brings benefits other channels can't. For sellers, that means working on one's craft daily and becoming recognized as a valuable resource. If anything, the modern-day salesperson is coaching themselves long before the manager even gets to them. Thankfully, we live in an age where self-enablement is genuinely possible. Smart managers support this self-enablement and "coaching" becomes a joint initiative.

Link to Webinar

Our thanks to Gerhard Gschwandtner at Selling Power (always quality content!) and Tom Stanfill at Aslan Training, Atlanta GA.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

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Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Sales Leadership: Who to Coach and How to Coach

This week's content is a webinar from Selling Power Magazine. We wanted to share it because it provides an excellent approach for framing a sales coaching strategy. In particular it will help you to answer the question: with whom do I invest scarce coaching time?

1. They recommend to coach a salesperson based on what they are prepared to do, rather than "attitude". Action trumps attitude. They give the example of a seller who needs to work on their discovery skills. If they are excited by their job and role they will show an improvement by "Friday evening" or not at all. If you have any experience as a manager, you will know this to be the case.

2. There is no point investing time with anyone where the desire is not there. Desire determines development. (This idea is not exclusive to sales).

3. All coaching should start with understanding the other person's point of view - even if it's a million miles from your own. It saves a lot of wasted time for the seller and the manager.

Why is this important?

Buyers have raised the bar for all suppliers, vendors and partners. Today, buyers only want to work with sellers whose advice is worth listening to. Buyers are always looking for better and easier ways to get things done. They only turn to salespeople when that channel brings benefits other channels can't. For sellers, that means working on one's craft daily and becoming recognized as a valuable resource. If anything, the modern-day salesperson is coaching themselves long before the manager even gets to them. Thankfully, we live in an age where self-enablement is genuinely possible. Smart managers support this self-enablement and "coaching" becomes a joint initiative.

Link to Webinar

Our thanks to Gerhard Gschwandtner at Selling Power (always quality content!) and Tom Stanfill at Aslan Training, Atlanta GA.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Sales Leadership: Who to Coach and How to Coach

This week's content is a webinar from Selling Power Magazine. We wanted to share it because it provides an excellent approach for framing a sales coaching strategy. In particular it will help you to answer the question: with whom do I invest scarce coaching time?

1. They recommend to coach a salesperson based on what they are prepared to do, rather than "attitude". Action trumps attitude. They give the example of a seller who needs to work on their discovery skills. If they are excited by their job and role they will show an improvement by "Friday evening" or not at all. If you have any experience as a manager, you will know this to be the case.

2. There is no point investing time with anyone where the desire is not there. Desire determines development. (This idea is not exclusive to sales).

3. All coaching should start with understanding the other person's point of view - even if it's a million miles from your own. It saves a lot of wasted time for the seller and the manager.

Why is this important?

Buyers have raised the bar for all suppliers, vendors and partners. Today, buyers only want to work with sellers whose advice is worth listening to. Buyers are always looking for better and easier ways to get things done. They only turn to salespeople when that channel brings benefits other channels can't. For sellers, that means working on one's craft daily and becoming recognized as a valuable resource. If anything, the modern-day salesperson is coaching themselves long before the manager even gets to them. Thankfully, we live in an age where self-enablement is genuinely possible. Smart managers support this self-enablement and "coaching" becomes a joint initiative.

Link to Webinar

Our thanks to Gerhard Gschwandtner at Selling Power (always quality content!) and Tom Stanfill at Aslan Training, Atlanta GA.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.