Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Two Observations from Interviewing 1,000 Salespeople

When you have been involved in interviewing 1,000+ salespeople, it's an opportunity to reflect and see are there any observations worth sharing. Here are two of those observations.

Observation 1 - The Seller Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists among the majority of salespeople. But it is gradually changing to the "salesperson as professional". Progressive sellers do something others don't; they invest in their own development and lean on their expertise not their personality. They are self-correcting. They are more introvert than extrovert! They understand that what they are is more valuable than who they are - to buyers.

Observation 2 - The Employer Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists there also. "Sales" is frequently not seen as a role or function that requires systems, planning or approaches. The hope is that a particular multi-dimensional personality will turn up and somehow get people to buy things. It's a culture that is hard to shift. However, the companies, especially in the SMB economy that are winning, take the opposite approach to their investment in personal selling. They hire, onboard and develop their salespeople as a capital investment.

The Buyer Side: The cult of salesperson as "social personality" is over. Buyers will now try every channel other than "sales" to educate themselves and explore options. What's changed is that the alternative channels grow by the day, which begs the question, what role do buyers want live salespeople to play, now that a chatbot is starting to do a half-decent job? Unless vendors train their salespeople to deliver a superior buyer experience, chatbots and coders will logically replace B2B sellers. Winning then becomes a marketing and branding game, which most SMB companies will never be able to afford. The upside of having a sales organization that is fit-for-purpose is that it gives every firm the chance to differentiate and compete, in a world where products per category are becoming increasingly similar and of equal quality.

Conclusion: Sellers and employers need to take their cues from the buyer side. Buyers will deal with salespeople (and vendors) who can bring quality dialogue that helps them make sense of their options and better decisions for their business. That requires the planning, the tools, the systems, the processes and the mindset. The mindset is the weakest link of course. And it's why this holds true: There is a severe shortage of professional salespeople for the SMB economy. But there is no shortage of good people, waiting to meet sales leaders who will enable them to become the company's most powerful asset. Success in a sales role is a joint venture between the seller and their direct manager. When that's "right", the buyer can hear, see, experience and feel the benefits.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

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Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Two Observations from Interviewing 1,000 Salespeople

When you have been involved in interviewing 1,000+ salespeople, it's an opportunity to reflect and see are there any observations worth sharing. Here are two of those observations.

Observation 1 - The Seller Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists among the majority of salespeople. But it is gradually changing to the "salesperson as professional". Progressive sellers do something others don't; they invest in their own development and lean on their expertise not their personality. They are self-correcting. They are more introvert than extrovert! They understand that what they are is more valuable than who they are - to buyers.

Observation 2 - The Employer Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists there also. "Sales" is frequently not seen as a role or function that requires systems, planning or approaches. The hope is that a particular multi-dimensional personality will turn up and somehow get people to buy things. It's a culture that is hard to shift. However, the companies, especially in the SMB economy that are winning, take the opposite approach to their investment in personal selling. They hire, onboard and develop their salespeople as a capital investment.

The Buyer Side: The cult of salesperson as "social personality" is over. Buyers will now try every channel other than "sales" to educate themselves and explore options. What's changed is that the alternative channels grow by the day, which begs the question, what role do buyers want live salespeople to play, now that a chatbot is starting to do a half-decent job? Unless vendors train their salespeople to deliver a superior buyer experience, chatbots and coders will logically replace B2B sellers. Winning then becomes a marketing and branding game, which most SMB companies will never be able to afford. The upside of having a sales organization that is fit-for-purpose is that it gives every firm the chance to differentiate and compete, in a world where products per category are becoming increasingly similar and of equal quality.

Conclusion: Sellers and employers need to take their cues from the buyer side. Buyers will deal with salespeople (and vendors) who can bring quality dialogue that helps them make sense of their options and better decisions for their business. That requires the planning, the tools, the systems, the processes and the mindset. The mindset is the weakest link of course. And it's why this holds true: There is a severe shortage of professional salespeople for the SMB economy. But there is no shortage of good people, waiting to meet sales leaders who will enable them to become the company's most powerful asset. Success in a sales role is a joint venture between the seller and their direct manager. When that's "right", the buyer can hear, see, experience and feel the benefits.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Two Observations from Interviewing 1,000 Salespeople

When you have been involved in interviewing 1,000+ salespeople, it's an opportunity to reflect and see are there any observations worth sharing. Here are two of those observations.

Observation 1 - The Seller Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists among the majority of salespeople. But it is gradually changing to the "salesperson as professional". Progressive sellers do something others don't; they invest in their own development and lean on their expertise not their personality. They are self-correcting. They are more introvert than extrovert! They understand that what they are is more valuable than who they are - to buyers.

Observation 2 - The Employer Side: The cult of salesperson as a "social personality" persists there also. "Sales" is frequently not seen as a role or function that requires systems, planning or approaches. The hope is that a particular multi-dimensional personality will turn up and somehow get people to buy things. It's a culture that is hard to shift. However, the companies, especially in the SMB economy that are winning, take the opposite approach to their investment in personal selling. They hire, onboard and develop their salespeople as a capital investment.

The Buyer Side: The cult of salesperson as "social personality" is over. Buyers will now try every channel other than "sales" to educate themselves and explore options. What's changed is that the alternative channels grow by the day, which begs the question, what role do buyers want live salespeople to play, now that a chatbot is starting to do a half-decent job? Unless vendors train their salespeople to deliver a superior buyer experience, chatbots and coders will logically replace B2B sellers. Winning then becomes a marketing and branding game, which most SMB companies will never be able to afford. The upside of having a sales organization that is fit-for-purpose is that it gives every firm the chance to differentiate and compete, in a world where products per category are becoming increasingly similar and of equal quality.

Conclusion: Sellers and employers need to take their cues from the buyer side. Buyers will deal with salespeople (and vendors) who can bring quality dialogue that helps them make sense of their options and better decisions for their business. That requires the planning, the tools, the systems, the processes and the mindset. The mindset is the weakest link of course. And it's why this holds true: There is a severe shortage of professional salespeople for the SMB economy. But there is no shortage of good people, waiting to meet sales leaders who will enable them to become the company's most powerful asset. Success in a sales role is a joint venture between the seller and their direct manager. When that's "right", the buyer can hear, see, experience and feel the benefits.

Sales Virtual | +353-1-6100777 | +44-207-1830165 | +1 (929) 214 1072 |

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
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