Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Measure What the Buyer is Doing (not saying)

A big part of opportunity management is figuring out what the buyer is thinking. We're all used to reporting what "went on" at the meeting: it's a great opportunity for them and us. We're all excited. Then 2 months and sometimes 2 years later, nothing. But it's still a great opportunity and that truly was a great meeting and the deal stays in the forecast. If you really want to know what a buyer is thinking, measure what they are doing, not saying. Most people - even edgy buyers - seldom give you a blunt "no". It's much worse than that; they disguise "no" as yes, because they know that most salespeople will accept any soft commitment, so long as it sounds sort of yes.

An opportunity is not an opportunity until the buyer decides to invest time with the seller. That investment by the buyer takes the form of them putting your name in their calendar. Anything less is a soft commitment. And you just don't get into a prospect's calendar by asking; you have to earn it through the quality of your conversation. Long before your product is bought or installed, the only clue the buyer has that you might be able to help is the quality of your dialogue.

Measure your performance by the number of prospects who are eager to schedule more time with you. Measure what the buyer is doing, and not just saying. And don't just ask for commitments from buyers; earn them.

This Week's Workout:

Examine each of your opportunities and check how many of them have scheduled calendar time with the buyer in place. Then start to figure out what it would take on your part to earn a slot in the buyer's calendar.

enquire@salesvirtual.com

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Measure What the Buyer is Doing (not saying)

A big part of opportunity management is figuring out what the buyer is thinking. We're all used to reporting what "went on" at the meeting: it's a great opportunity for them and us. We're all excited. Then 2 months and sometimes 2 years later, nothing. But it's still a great opportunity and that truly was a great meeting and the deal stays in the forecast. If you really want to know what a buyer is thinking, measure what they are doing, not saying. Most people - even edgy buyers - seldom give you a blunt "no". It's much worse than that; they disguise "no" as yes, because they know that most salespeople will accept any soft commitment, so long as it sounds sort of yes.

An opportunity is not an opportunity until the buyer decides to invest time with the seller. That investment by the buyer takes the form of them putting your name in their calendar. Anything less is a soft commitment. And you just don't get into a prospect's calendar by asking; you have to earn it through the quality of your conversation. Long before your product is bought or installed, the only clue the buyer has that you might be able to help is the quality of your dialogue.

Measure your performance by the number of prospects who are eager to schedule more time with you. Measure what the buyer is doing, and not just saying. And don't just ask for commitments from buyers; earn them.

This Week's Workout:

Examine each of your opportunities and check how many of them have scheduled calendar time with the buyer in place. Then start to figure out what it would take on your part to earn a slot in the buyer's calendar.

enquire@salesvirtual.com

Selling for "Non-Salespeople"
The New B2B Sales Game
How Sales Coaching is Meant to Work
Managing The Pipeline (All)
Getting Your Sales Pitch to Echo
Opportunity Creation (All)
Reviving Stalled Deals [Part 1]
Opportunity Capture (All)
Think "Warm Up" Versus "Call Planning"
Opportunity Creation (All)
The Sales Pipeline Gamechanger
Managing The Pipeline (All)
What is an "Income-Producing" Opportunity?
Managing The Pipeline (All)

Measure What the Buyer is Doing (not saying)

A big part of opportunity management is figuring out what the buyer is thinking. We're all used to reporting what "went on" at the meeting: it's a great opportunity for them and us. We're all excited. Then 2 months and sometimes 2 years later, nothing. But it's still a great opportunity and that truly was a great meeting and the deal stays in the forecast. If you really want to know what a buyer is thinking, measure what they are doing, not saying. Most people - even edgy buyers - seldom give you a blunt "no". It's much worse than that; they disguise "no" as yes, because they know that most salespeople will accept any soft commitment, so long as it sounds sort of yes.

An opportunity is not an opportunity until the buyer decides to invest time with the seller. That investment by the buyer takes the form of them putting your name in their calendar. Anything less is a soft commitment. And you just don't get into a prospect's calendar by asking; you have to earn it through the quality of your conversation. Long before your product is bought or installed, the only clue the buyer has that you might be able to help is the quality of your dialogue.

Measure your performance by the number of prospects who are eager to schedule more time with you. Measure what the buyer is doing, and not just saying. And don't just ask for commitments from buyers; earn them.

This Week's Workout:

Examine each of your opportunities and check how many of them have scheduled calendar time with the buyer in place. Then start to figure out what it would take on your part to earn a slot in the buyer's calendar.

enquire@salesvirtual.com

Want To Be Notified When New Content is Released?

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.